FishyPi


The FishyPi, by Mingyu

The FishyPi, by Mingyu

FishyPi serving suggestion

FishyPi serving suggestion

Rich in omega-3

Rich in omega-3

It's a tin o' fish...it's a Pi...it's a FishyPi!

It's a tin o' fish...it's a Pi...it's a FishyPi!


"There's something fishy about this Pi..."

August 2012

A £0 case for the £30 mini computer.

Keywords: Raspberry Pi, sardines tin, metalworking, recycling

Exactly what it says on the...er...tin.

Materials used

Everything apart from the tin itself comes from my tinkering stash (interesting bits of packaging accumulated over the years).

Tools used

I borrowed the first two off a housemate; everything else is mine.

How to make one

  1. Prepare the Green Stuff, form it into balls and press them into the corners of the tin.
  2. Blu-Tack paper onto the underside corners of the Pi and squish them into the Green Stuff. You can peel the paper off once the Green Stuff has dried. I left out the paper bit first time round and accidentally gave my Pi knobbly corners!
  3. Draw openings on the outside of the tin. For squarish holes, join the corners to form a X. For long narrow ones (such as the SD card slot), join them up with two tail-to-tail Ys, like this: >--<
  4. Lift the Pi out of the tin and mould the Green Stuff with your fingers so that it slightly overhangs the impressions left by the Pi. This will help secure the Pi. (Make sure you don't obstruct the power jack and Ethernet port!)
  5. While the Green Stuff is drying, make the lid: trace the lip of the tin onto a plastic sheet, shrink the shape by about 3mm on each side and cut it out. If your plastic is flimsy like mine, make a second one by tracing the lid onto another sheet.
  6. To make the fake etching, trace the Raspberry Pi logo onto tracing paper and cut it out. I used the Raspberry Pi Twitter icon because it was just the right size. Gently dab at the cutting with a blob of Blu-Tack (or an art eraser) to get rid of pencil marks.
  7. Mix 1 part craft (PVA) glue with 2 parts water and soak the cutting in the solution for a couple of minutes. Blot off the excess, then position it in the middle of the lid. Leave to dry.
  8. Back to the tin: remember those Xs and Ys? Drill holes along them and join up the holes to form little flaps. Keep a firm grip on the tin while you're doing this, and ease the awl in by turning and wiggling instead of stabbing.
  9. Poke a pen through the openings and lever the flaps into place. Use pliers and wire cutters to tame particularly unruly ones. Tip: whenever the pliers are straddling a wall of the tin, pad them with thin card so they don't scratch the paint.
  10. If you have any Green Stuff left over, use a couple of blobs to secure the lid. Otherwise make clips out of wire ties and stick them in place with Blu-Tack or glue. Shave off a couple of millimetres from each end of the lid to make it fit correctly, pop the lid back in, and voilà - a FishyPi!

Why 'FishyPi'?

Because there already is a FishPi, and a very cool one at that.

Special thanks to:


Cardboard Broomstick The Woolly Reader